Find or Sell Motorcycles & Scooters in USA

2011 Yamaha Stryker on 2040-motos

$8,499
YearYear:2011 MileageMileage:0 ColorColor: Reddish Copper
QR code

Yamaha Other tech info

TypeType:Cruiser PhonePhone:(866) 474-7536

Yamaha Other description

2011 Yamaha Stryker, 2011 Yamaha Stryker, XVS13CAO - STRYKES FEAR INTO EVERYTHING ELSE The all-new Stryker by Star Motorcycles is the coolest bike to roll off the assembly line since the Raider took the industry by storm. With its raked out front end and "fists in the wind" riding position, this bike is pure attitude. And with fuel injection, a 1,304 cc v-twin, and a beautiful final belt drive, the Stryker churns out plenty of low-end torque that gets to the ground in a very satisfying way. It's time for an attitude adjustment!

Moto blog

Yamaha XJ Series: New Online Campaign [Pics and Video]

Wed, 06 May 2009

Yamaha Motor Europe has just posted a video up on YouTube to promote their new XJ-Series bikes.  The XJ6 and the XJ6 Diversion. And the XJ6 Diversion: Virtually every feature on this attractive new 600 has been designed to ensure that the new XJ6 Diversion delivers all of the style, fun and ease of use that today’s middleweight rider is looking for. Its newly-developed 600 cc liquid-cooled 4-stroke inline 4-cylinder engine has been designed to deliver a smooth band of easy-to-handle power, making the XJ6 Diversion an ideal machine for new and experienced riders.

Lorenzo And Rossi Unveil Yamaha MotoGP 2014 Livery

Fri, 17 Jan 2014

Yamaha’s official MotoGP outfit unveiled the team’s official 2014 livery in front of a packed audience in Jakarta, Indonesia. The team’s two factory riders, Jorge Lorenzo and Valentino Rossi, were on hand to proudly showcase their YZF-M1 motorcycles. As expected, blue, Yamaha’s factory color, plays a major role in the color scheme, but unlike last year where it was the dominant color, it is equally offset by contrasting white swaths on the upper fairing, fuel tank, and throughout the lower fairing.

Kevin Ash, one year on

Wed, 08 Jan 2014

I’ve lost dozens of friends in bike racing over the years, and while each death was a shock and incredibly sad, I’ve always had some kind of internal coping mechanism that allowed me to carry on relatively unaffected.  Maybe it’s because I was always extremely passionate and committed when taking part in my dangerous sport so was also prepared to pay the ultimate price should things go wrong.  Rightly or wrongly I’ve taken comfort from the fact that these unfortunate racers have checked out while doing something they love.   I’ve also lost a few journalist friends in bike accidents over the years but for some reason these have hit me harder.  The worst and possibly as it is the most recent is Kevin Ash who was killed last January while on a BMW launch in South Africa.  Starting in 2001, over a period of ten years, I was in Kevin’s company on countless new bike launches in pretty much every corner of the world.  At times he was cocky and occasionally irritating but always entertaining with a wicked sense of humour.  He was many things but no one can deny he was a brilliant journalist and his technical knowledge was second to none.  I always appreciated his complete enthusiasm to all things biking as he would ride through any weather on a daily basis to jobs or airports and seemed to always be tinkering with winter projects (mainly Ducatis) at home.  I also admired how much work he got through as he had columns in more than one weekly publication plus all his launch and web work. He was a competent safe rider who was certainly quick enough to evaluate any new bike thrown his way.  Kevin also drove a Porsche but then none of us are perfect!   I looked to Kevin as a wise Owl so not long after I started working with TWO/ Visordown, I asked him on an R1 launch in Australia he thought the motorcycle industry was currently in a good place.  His reply was, ‘we’ve just been flown here business class, been taken by speed boat to our five star hotel under Sydney Harbour Bridge, Yamaha have wined and dined us and furnished us with expensive gifts each day, what do you think Niall?  How times have changed.  On the subject on air travel he once told me, ‘when travelling business or first class it’s not about the pampering, comfy beds or fine dining, the important part is looking smug as you walk straight past all the people lining up at the cattle class check in! On more than one occasion I had food or drink spurt out when Kevin would deliver unexpected one line funnies at the dinner table.