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1968 Triumph Trophy on 2040-motos

YearYear:1968 MileageMileage:99 ColorColor: Blue
Location:

Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States

Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States
1968 Triumph Trophy, image 1

Triumph Trophy photos

1968 Triumph Trophy, image 2 1968 Triumph Trophy, image 3 1968 Triumph Trophy, image 4 1968 Triumph Trophy, image 5 1968 Triumph Trophy, image 6

Triumph Trophy tech info

Engine Size (cc)Engine Size (cc):650 WarrantyWarranty:Vehicle does NOT have an existing warranty TypeType:Standard For Sale ByFor Sale By:Private Seller

Triumph Trophy description

Clean bike, sorted runs nicely, new,rebuilt ,or refurbished through out. TR6R

Moto blog

Classic Off-Road Bikes Featured in Braving Baja: 1,000 Miles to Glory Exhibition

Sat, 06 Apr 2013 00:00:00 -0700

Back in the 60s, American Honda tested the durability of its motorcycles by sending a CL72 Scrambler on a 950-mile trek through rocks, sand washes, dry lake beds, mountain passes and paved roads. Fifty years later, that legendary run is remembered for inspiring one of the most significant off-road races in the world—the Baja 1000. In celebration, the Petersen Automotive Museum in Los Angeles is hosting a tribute dinner, one-day off road show, and summer-long exhibition called Braving Baja, 1,000 Miles to Glory.

Recall for 2011 Triumph Tiger 800, 800XC Accessory Center Stands

Mon, 29 Aug 2011 00:00:00 -0700

Triumph is recalling accessory center stands for the 2011 Tiger 800 and Tiger 800XC because of a defective return spring. According to documents released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the return springs on the  accessory center stand for the Triumph Tiger 800 and 800XC may not always return to its original length, potentially leading to a loose center stand and a fracture in the spring wire. Riders may detect a rattling sound from the loose stand and in the case of a fractured spring, a scraping sound caused by the center stand dragging along the road.

Filling a void with an RD350LC

Mon, 29 Jul 2013 00:00:00 -0700

Last winter I managed to fill a void in my life when I stumbled on a very reasonably priced Yamaha RD350LC.  It was a tad scruffy, had the wrong exhausts but most importantly it was blue and white with all numbers matching.  I had the usual euphoria when the deal was done but I underestimated how much pleasure this particular purchase would continue to deliver another eight months down the line. The difference with this old bike is, instead of just taking it for the occasional ride I was talked into doing a full nut and bolt restoration.  Having never taking a bike apart completely before, initially it was quite daunting but I soon found the RD is easy to work on so it turned into a truly satisfying experience.  I’ve had some help from LC enthusiasts with the rebuild, however, the stripping, sourcing and organising was a total labour of love.  And call me sad but it has made me bond with this bike like no other which only adds to the feel good factor.  The bike cost £1800 and I’ve spent around £1000 but I reckon my mint Elsie is now worth a fair bit more.   I fancy rejuvenating a Fizzy  next time but there’s lots of other cheap 70’s and 80’s winter projects  out there so why not have a go yourself?